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20121004
20121004
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of international law. >> reporter: turkey took action against syria after a deadly shelling. among the dead a 6-year-old boy. several people were also injured including a police officer. turkey says it retaliated in points in syria detected with radar. the united states is in contact with turkish officials. >> it's a very dangerous situation. all responsible nations need to band together to persuade the assad regime to have a cease-fire. >> reporter: parts of the syrian city of lipo laid in rubles. syrian state tv said three suicide bombers detonated cars packed with explosives killing 34 people. three blasts went off within minutes of each other near military officer's club pap fourth struck near the chamber of commerce. the city has become one of the biggest battlegrounds in the 18 month fight between rebels and government forces. syria's parliament condemned the bombings referring to the rebels as terrorists trying to out of president bashir al assad. lipo has seen intense fighting but been rarely the target of suicide attacks. the kploegs triggered panic among some residents who just want t
media access for the criminals would have changed their audience from just the local law enforcement audience to having a global audience. on the other hand the tools, the tools that law enforcement has access to today would have been critical in solving the case probably a little more quickly than what they were able to do then. >> reporter: this is some of the new technology. >> virtually unlimited. >> a device carrying thousands of license plates her hours. >> we had cops stopping vehicles, identifying the occupants. we may have been able to have resolved this quicker. >> reporter: had this existed in 2002, they could have seen this plate, the one on the sniper's fearsome killing machine, dozens of times during their shooting spree. and it could have literally lifted a needle from a hay stack. now those devices have been deployed here at mike montgomery county for about two years now. dozens of them per second at 60 miles per hour. it is truly astounding technology and officers here, they only wish they had it ten years ago. reporting live with montgomery are county police, scott
the local law enforcement audience to having a global audience. on the other hand, the tools that law enforcement has accessed to today, they would have been critical in solving the case probably a little more quickly than what they were able to then. >> reporter: this is some of that new technology. >> it is virtually unlimited. >> a device capturing thousands of license plates for hours, showing up the information instantly. >> we had cops running tags, recording tags, stopping vehicles, identifying occupants. we may have been able to solved this quickly. >> reporter: the system could have told police that they had seen this here. the one on the sniper's blue killing machine dozens of times during their shooting spree. and it could have literally lifted a needle from the hay stack. scott broom, 9news now. >>> now, those devices have been deemployed -- deployed for about two years now. reading dozens of license plates every second from cars going 60 miles an hour. >>> a scaffold collapses leaving two workers dangling from the safety harnesses. it happened this afternoon right outside
decisions about what treatments are given. that's explicitly prohibited in the law. but let's go back to what governor romney indicated that under his plan he would be able to cover people with preexisting conditions. well, actually, governor, that isn't what your plan does. what your plan does is to duplicate what's already the law which says if you are out of health insurance for three months than you can end up getting continuous coverage and an insurance company can't deny you if it's been under 90 days. but that's already the law. and that doesn't help the millions of people out there with preexisting conditions there's a why reason governor romney set up the plan that he did in massachusetts. it wasn't a government takeover of health care, it was the largest expansion of private insurance. but what it does say is that insurers, you've got to take everybody. now, that also means that you've got more customers. but when governor romney says he'll replace it with something but can't detail how it will be, in fact, replaced and the reason he set up the system he did in massachusetts
health care law to which the president responded by saying, but we've seen this model work really well in massachusetts. here's part of that exchange. >> i want to take the $716 billion you've cut it and put it back into medicare. by the way, we can include a prescription program. but the idea of cutting $716 billion from medicare to be able to balance the additional cost of obama care is in my opinion a mistake. with regards to young people coming along, i've got proposals to make sure medicare and social security are there for them without any question. >> if you repeal obama care and i have become fond of this term obama care, if you repeal it, what happens is those seniors right away are going to be paying $600 more in prescription care. they're going to have to be paying copays for basic checkups that can keep them healthier and the primary beneficiary of that repeal are insurance companies that are estimated to gainle billions of dollars -- gain billions of dollars back when they aren't making seniors any healthier. i don't think that's the right approach to making sure that medi
where that was the rule of law. violence breeding violence and revenge killing after revenge killing for 30 years. i could totally relate to that. >> reporter: neeson, a 60-year- old oscar nominee nearly four decades into his career loves being cast as an action hero. >> hollywood started sending me these action scripts. i was very pleased. i felt like a big kid. >> it's great to see somebody his age is doing it and doing it so well and people are responding to him so positively. >> reporter: neeson says he'll keep doing action movies till his knees give out. alexis christoforous, cbs news,
police, reports a false emergency and brings out law enforcement. it happened to computer gamers and bloggers and miley cyrus. someone called the police to her home in august with a 911 call reporting shots fired. it was yet another hoax but one with serious consequences. if caught perpetrators face a $10,000 fine and up to three years in prison. >> officers put their life on the line every day. when they get a call, they think about going home to their families. >> reporter: kutcher was not home wednesday morning but later tweeted from the set of his sitcom said safe and sound at "two and a half men." don't miss tomorrow night at 8:30. it might have only been a hoax but no reason to pass up an opportunity for a little self-promotion. >> i like having somebody here i can trust. >>> self-promotion aside it's just not funny. so far they have a hard time catching the people responsible for doing that. >> i never heard of that before. first time i heard of it. >> that's why we're here at cbs "this morning." >> yes. >> there are millions of old wooden utility poles. as they get older
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7